Putting IronScheme to good use...

Aug 19, 2012 at 4:59 PM

It's fast, I say it's not just fast, it's blazing fast, even on my AMD Neo @ 1.6Ghz with 2GB RAM.

But, what could IronScheme be possibly used for?

Umnn, let me guess, native software development using Scheme!!
But, then again, aren't there other great Scheme implementations out there?

Umnn, it could be used as a tool for education;
Not just to teach Computer Science wisdom via "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs", but, also to create constraint based systems (think Turtle Graphics without Logo) to run on the .NET platform.

It could also be used as a software development tool for the .NET Framework, yeah, F# is there, but, frankly, is there enough literature out there to support F# as there is for Scheme?
All that's required is a nice way to interact with .NET objects, is there anything being done on that front? Maybe I've been obtuse and missed something. :-)

Coordinator
Aug 22, 2012 at 6:21 PM
mayureshkathe wrote:

It's fast, I say it's not just fast, it's blazing fast, even on my AMD Neo @ 1.6Ghz with 2GB RAM.

It could also be used as a software development tool for the .NET Framework, yeah, F# is there, but, frankly, is there enough literature out there to support F# as there is for Scheme?

All that's required is a nice way to interact with .NET objects, is there anything being done on that front? Maybe I've been obtuse and missed something. :-)

Being fast is debatable :) It is just as fast as Clojure, but still many times (but not factors) slower than Ikarus/Vicare, which generates native code. 

Some numbers on my i7 PC. Bootstrapping takes about 7 seconds. The R6RS test suite runs in 15 seconds. I am sure it would be 5-10 times slower on your CPU ;p

F# is 'owned' by MS, there is no reason to compete with that ;p

IronScheme can already interact with pretty much any .NET object. The (ironscheme clr) library provides constructs for that on a syntactic level, so calling a .NET method is identical to calling it in C# (on an IL level) and there is no overhead. The only 'burden' is the verbosity of the Scheme code. This is partially address by using the (ironscheme clr shorthand) library.

See

http://xacc.wordpress.com/2009/08/16/new-clr-shorthand-syntax/

http://xacc.wordpress.com/2009/08/19/added-another-clr-helper-let-clr-type/

http://xacc.wordpress.com/2009/08/21/ironscheme-clr-shorthand/

Aug 24, 2012 at 4:38 AM


From: [email removed]
To: [email removed]
Date: Thu, 23 Aug 2012 15:09:26 -0700
Subject: Re: Putting IronScheme to good use... [IronScheme:392235]

From: leppie
mayureshkathe wrote:
It's fast, I say it's not just fast, it's blazing fast, even on my AMD Neo @ 1.6Ghz with 2GB RAM.
It could also be used as a software development tool for the .NET Framework, yeah, F# is there, but, frankly, is there enough literature out there to support F# as there is for Scheme?
All that's required is a nice way to interact with .NET objects, is there anything being done on that front? Maybe I've been obtuse and missed something. :-)
Being fast is debatable :) It is just as fast as Clojure, but still many times (but not factors) slower than Ikarus/Vicare, which generates native code.
Some numbers on my i7 PC. Bootstrapping takes about 7 seconds. The R6RS test suite runs in 15 seconds. I am sure it would be 5-10 times slower on your CPU ;p
F# is 'owned' by MS, there is no reason to compete with that ;p
IronScheme can already interact with pretty much any .NET object. The (ironscheme clr) library provides constructs for that on a syntactic level, so calling a .NET method is identical to calling it in C# (on an IL level) and there is no overhead. The only 'burden' is the verbosity of the Scheme code. This is partially address by using the (ironscheme clr shorthand) library.

Ikarus/Vicare use something like JIT, if I've understood the material right.
Frankly speaking, JIT, in software, is quite the same as SHIT (some how in time). :-P
F# is ofcourse owned by M$, but, are they ever going to get the same kind of critical mass as what Scheme has had and continues to have? (that's me in mba (marketing) mode) ;-)
Competition in good, it keeps all involved parties sharp (see, there's a # everywhere). :-)

On a more serious note, hope you aren't giving up pushing IronScheme beyond being just a personal toy project. I'm quite sure there would be people out there who would like to use it for work beyond just experimentation. :-)

Cheers.